Frozen prey & Vitamins

Frozen prey for boas

Frozen prey is most convenient for the keeper. Some reptile specialty stores ship frozen rodents, which, however, don’t always arrive in that same condition.

It is therefore best to purchase live animals, to kill them quickly and painlessly, and to subsequently freeze them. This also eliminates amoeba and other parasites, which the prey could be contaminated with.

It is quickly thawed when needed, however, this should be done thoroughly, because boas don’t  want to lick on the rat like a popsicle. The rodent, or whatever you are offering, should be luke warm, since the snake could otherwise get sick.

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Vitamins for boas

One disadvantage of frozen prey should be mentioned: Vitamins are lost in the freezing process. It is therefore necessary to add a vitamine supplement occasionally.

Best suitable for this are liquid supplements (available at pharmacies).

It is not recommended to pour this over the prey animals, as the snake may become irritated by the smell of the medication. It is better to inject a small amount (one to several drops, depending on the size of the snake) into the dead rodent, using a syringe.

At this point, keepers should be cautioned not to overdo these supplements, as the vitamine A, which is contained in most vitamine supplements, can lead to shortened shed cycles if overapplied. It often takes a long time before the body can work off the excess vitamine A.

The most natural way to provide our boas with all the necessities is to breed the prey animals yourself, and feeding them with high-quality food. Rats love fruit pieces and lettuce. Only rodents that have been raised on stale bread do not make good snake food.

Another thing: Avoid offering rejected prey items to other animals. Nasty diseases have been passed along enclosures that way.